It is my opinion that since single celled organism, as well as a large amount of multi-cellular ones, are incapable of thought, experience, perception, desire, among other things, that there is zero reason to afford them any rights at all. This will probably make you uncomfortable, and I'm sorry about that. I think that your attachment to creatures incapable of such unhappiness as they cause you is problematic. You should seek to overcome the attachment. That said, hilarious blog, good read.

Four words:

Check your eukaryotic privilege.

How do your superiors let you work in healthcare, an environment that is so obsessed with hygiene and cleanliness that you even have to ensure that water travels only one way down your arms when you prep for surgery? Also how do you support the 'rights' of an organism with no evidence of higher level cognition to be able to understand cognition, or of organisms whose sole function is to feed off (and sometimes kill) their hosts? Evolution dictates that (cntd...)

Anonymous

1. Speciecists like you are the very reason healthcare acts in that way, which is problematic in and of itself. You should strive for change and acceptance of all species, prokaryotic or eukaryotic, not the opposite.

2. Are you seriously equating bacteria with parasites? 10^6 cannot tolerate such degree of ignorance. 10^99 do not just feed off eukaryotes and if 10^9 kill you it’s just an unintended effect of the very evolution you talk about.
Also, you’re human cognition and mood is determined in a great part by your microbiome. Read about the NIH’s human microbiome project to inform yourself.

How do you feel about bacteria who live in other animals in order to maintain their bodily functions? Is that appropriation, too?

Anonymous

Bacteria living in animals (including humans) are not appropriation. 10^n are willingly and happily as part of their microbiome and are responsible for important functions such as digestion, cardiovascular health and even mood and cognition.

Appropriation is when eukaryotes isolate and enslave bacteria to fulfill their selfish purposes (e.g cultures, fermentation, gene cloning, etc), as well as energy generation in the case of mitochondria and chloroplasts

How in the hell do you identify as a germ? Should I spray you with Lysol?

You should begin by adding the G-word to the list of unspeakable slurs (you know, next to all the other racist, homophobic, transphobic, ableist, etc. words).
Second, 10^6 identify as proud transbacteria, and constitute an important part of the biosphere and even the human microbiome. Bring your death treats somewhere else, you bleachlady

hey bro , ever thought about killing yourself

the-real-seebs:

vastderp:

ceruleancynic:

the-real-seebs:

that-darned-sock:

(VastDerp Seriousness Warning: I’m pausing the joke replies for a second because this is important.)

Yes actually, I have thought about killing myself—as recently as this week. Suicide is a major risk for people like me who struggle with bipolar illness. I myself have been trying to stave off severe suicidal depression since October 2013, trying not to admit it’s gotten that bad, trying not to be too gloomy where other people can see, because making people worry only makes the depression worse and hurts more, trying to kid away the pain.

But yes, the thought is there.

It’s always there, waiting to be triggered by the internal voice in my head that sounds pretty much exactly like you sounded when you and four other people encouraged me to kill myself within the space of an hour.

But the weirdest thing happened just now: I decided not to.

I didn’t expect that the literal evil of Tumblr social justice could inspire me in this way, but thank you for getting the exact opposite result to the one you were hoping for when you told someone to commit suicide.

I can’t guarantee spite will get me over the next day, let alone the next decade, but right now I’m pretty much devoted to living to 190 and watching your graves pissed on by ducks.

Is that harsh? Go ahead and take all the time you need to come up with a burn sick enough to top it.

Because get this, you evil, despicable rectum of a human being, I just won at life.

I have a strong objection to the terminology in this post. The rectum may not be glorious, but it serves an important function in a healthy human body. Your metaphorical usage is thus inappropriate.

I think “rectal polyp” might work better.

Dear social justice kiddywinkles: words have power, and you are not as cool and edgy as you think you are. The kindest thing I can hope for the whole boiling of you is that one day you will be able to look back at the things you have said to other human beings and think: wow, I was a real piece of shit back then, I’m glad I’ve grown out of that.

the rectum is a shivering mucousy meat tunnel that produces only waste. i remain confident in my insult.

No, the rectum expels the waste, which was produced elsewhere. The people trying to make you kill yourself so they can score a great victory over disabled people are producing waste.

The rectum IS the most glorious (actually the only one) part of an eukaryote. It is home to millions of strong beautiful bacteria who will continue to rule the world. You all need to check your macroscopic privilege

sagansense:

Up until recently, the line between viruses and cells seemed pretty simple: cells were big and carried everything they needed to live and grow. Viruses were tiny and only carried the genes they needed to take over their host cells; they relied on their hosts for most essential proteins.

That line got a bit blurry as we found parasitic and symbiotic cells with very stripped-down, minimalist genomes that wouldn’t let them survive outside their hosts. But it’s nearly been obliterated by the discovery of giant viruses—some of these have genomes that are larger than those of bacteria and carry many of the genes needed to copy DNA and translate it into proteins.

Scientists have now identified yet another giant virus, this time using a technique that sounds like it’s straight out of a sci-fi horror flick: they thawed some 30,000-year-old permafrost and allowed any viruses present to infect some cells. Fortunately, the cells were amoebas, and this virus is overwhelmingly unlikely to present a threat to human health. But the fact that viruses could apparently survive so many centuries in the Siberian permafrost does lead the authors to suggest that the melting Arctic may pose an emerging disease risk.

The authors of the new paper, a mix of French and Russian researchers, identified the virus using a procedure that’s incredibly simple: take a culture of amoebas (a strain that has been found in the permafrost) and put a bit of permafrost in with the culture. After that, it was a matter of waiting for something bad to happen to the amoebas.


Largest viral genome yet carries 2,300 genes that are new to biology | The enormous new virus is visible with a light microscope.

The something bad in this case happened to be the explosion, or lysis, of the cells. A check of the culture showed the presence of a giant virus particle, shaped similarly to the Pandoravirus described in the article linked above. In terms of the sheer physical size of the virus, it’s the largest one we’ve yet discovered. Because of its jug-like shape, the authors named it Pithovirus after a type of amphora used by Pandora (the namesake of the second largest virus).

Continue reading at arstechnica

Isn’t this exciting! 10^6 hope that humans just don’t decide to go oppressing and enslaving pithovirus after reviving them!

sagansense:

Up until recently, the line between viruses and cells seemed pretty simple: cells were big and carried everything they needed to live and grow. Viruses were tiny and only carried the genes they needed to take over their host cells; they relied on their hosts for most essential proteins.

That line got a bit blurry as we found parasitic and symbiotic cells with very stripped-down, minimalist genomes that wouldn’t let them survive outside their hosts. But it’s nearly been obliterated by the discovery of giant viruses—some of these have genomes that are larger than those of bacteria and carry many of the genes needed to copy DNA and translate it into proteins.

Scientists have now identified yet another giant virus, this time using a technique that sounds like it’s straight out of a sci-fi horror flick: they thawed some 30,000-year-old permafrost and allowed any viruses present to infect some cells. Fortunately, the cells were amoebas, and this virus is overwhelmingly unlikely to present a threat to human health. But the fact that viruses could apparently survive so many centuries in the Siberian permafrost does lead the authors to suggest that the melting Arctic may pose an emerging disease risk.

The authors of the new paper, a mix of French and Russian researchers, identified the virus using a procedure that’s incredibly simple: take a culture of amoebas (a strain that has been found in the permafrost) and put a bit of permafrost in with the culture. After that, it was a matter of waiting for something bad to happen to the amoebas.

Largest viral genome yet carries 2,300 genes that are new to biology | The enormous new virus is visible with a light microscope.

The something bad in this case happened to be the explosion, or lysis, of the cells. A check of the culture showed the presence of a giant virus particle, shaped similarly to the Pandoravirus described in the article linked above. In terms of the sheer physical size of the virus, it’s the largest one we’ve yet discovered. Because of its jug-like shape, the authors named it Pithovirus after a type of amphora used by Pandora (the namesake of the second largest virus).

Continue reading at arstechnica

Isn’t this exciting! 10^6 hope that humans just don’t decide to go oppressing and enslaving pithovirus after reviving them!

It seems to me oppressive, presumptuous, even obscene to apply human moral structures and political concepts to the lives of bacteria, whose mode of being is far more mysterious than this blog dares imagine. The idea of privilege, or lack of it, reeks of humanity. Can biology, in its essence, include, confirm, deny, or participate in such a thing as compassion, given or received? Isn't compassion itself just another privilege of so-called sentience?

Anonymous

10^6 can only fathom bacterial existence (and possibly morals, sociology, ideas of privilege, etc) from our trans-bacterial point of view. 10^3 are unfortunately tied to our macroscopic eukaryotic body, and are therefore always checking our privilege.
HOWEVER, everyone in the SJ circles knows that BIOLOGY, as so many other things IS A SOCIAL CONSTRUCT meant to preserve all existing structures of power (eukaryarchy, cis-white patriarchy).
So quit your eukaryosplaining and biotruths